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GOV 2302: Science-Technology Policy

Introduction

Webb Instruments Perfected to Microscopic Levels"Webb Instruments Perfected to Microscopic Levels" by NASA Goddard Photo and Video is licensed under CC BY 2.0

"This course is an examination of the relationship between science-technology and government. It reviews the history of public policy for science and technology, theories and opinions about the proper role of government and several current issues on the national political agenda. Examples of these issues include genetic engineering, the environment and engineering education. It also examines the formation of science policy, the politics of science and technology, the science bureaucracy, enduring controversies such as public participation in scientific debates, the most effective means for supporting research, and the regulation of technology. Throughout the course we will pay particular attention to the fundamental theme: the tension between government demands for accountability and the scientific community's commitment to autonomy and self-regulation."

For a full listing of GOV-related courses, please see Department of Social Sciences and Policy Studies: GOV Course Descriptions.

James Webb Space Telescope Revealed"James Webb Space Telescope Revealed" by NASA Goddard Photo and Video is licensed under CC BY 2.0

From the Department of Social Sciences and Policy Research: 

"You must understand society to effectively address our global grand challenges. Toward this end, the Social Science & Policy Studies (SSPS) department prepares students to understand human behavior and cognition, the environment, sustainable development, policy design and evaluation, and systems thinking. Through our teaching and student research opportunities, we cultivate professionals who have a deep understanding of the social impacts of science, technology, and innovation. 

Our dedicated faculty offers students unique opportunities to make connections between societal concerns and technology through faculty-led research and student projects. To prepare themselves professionally, many of our students will double major in a technical field and a complementary SSPS-related degree. We also offer a variety of minors that can be uniquely paired with any major."

For a full description of programs and courses on offer, please refer to the Department of Social Science & Policy Studies

The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM)"The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM)" by NASA Goddard Photo and Video is licensed under CC BY 2.0